Juno nova mid-cycle meetup summary: conclusion

    There's been a lot of content in this series about the Juno Nova mid-cycle meetup, so thanks to those who followed along with me. I've also received a lot of positive feedback about the posts, so I am thinking the exercise is worthwhile, and will try to be more organized for the next mid-cycle (and therefore get these posts out earlier). To recap quickly, here's what was covered in the series:

    The first post in the series covered social issues: things like how we organized the mid-cycle meetup, how we should address core reviewer burnout, and the current state of play of the Juno release. Bug management has been an ongoing issue for Nova for a while, so we talked about bug management. We are making progress on this issue, but more needs to be done and it's going to take a lot of help for everyone to get there. There was also discussion about proposals on how to handle review workload in the Kilo release, although nothing has been finalized yet.

    The second post covered the current state of play for containers in Nova, as well as our future direction. Unexpectedly, this was by far the most read post in the series if Google Analytics is to be believed. There is clear interest in support for containers in Nova. I expect this to be a hot topic at the Paris summit as well. Another new feature we're working on is the Ironic driver merge into Nova. This is progressing well, and we hope to have it fully merged by the end of the Juno release cycle.

    At a superficial level the post about DB2 support in Nova is a simple tale of IBM's desire to have people use their database. However, to the skilled observer its deeper than that -- its a tale of love and loss, as well as a discussion of how to safely move our schema forward without causing undue pain for our large deployments. We also covered the state of cells support in Nova, with the main issue being that we really need cells to be feature complete. Hopefully people are working on a plan for this now. Another internal refactoring is the current scheduler work, which is important because it positions us for the future.

    We also discussed the next gen Nova API, and talked through the proposed upgrade path for the transition from nova-network to neutron.

    For those who are curious, there are 8,259 words (not that I am counting or anything) in this post series including this summary post. I estimate it took me about four working days to write (ED: and about two days for his trained team of technical writers to edit into mostly coherent English). I would love to get your feedback on if you found the series useful as it's a pretty big investment in time.

    Tags for this post: openstack juno nova mid-cycle summary

posted at: 23:47 | path: /openstack/juno | permanent link to this entry