Juno nova mid-cycle meetup summary: the next generation Nova API

    This is the final post in my series covering the highlights from the Juno Nova mid-cycle meetup. In this post I will cover our next generation API, which used to be called the v3 API but is largely now referred to as the v2.1 API. Getting to this point has been one of the more painful processes I think I've ever seen in Nova's development history, and I think we've learnt some important things about how large distributed projects operate along the way. My hope is that we remember these lessons next time we hit something as contentious as our API re-write has been.

    Now on to the API itself. It started out as an attempt to improve our current API to be more maintainable and less confusing to our users. We deliberately decided that we would not focus on adding features, but instead attempt to reduce as much technical debt as possible. This development effort went on for about a year before we realized we'd made a mistake. The mistake we made is that we assumed that our users would agree it was trivial to move to a new API, and that they'd do that even if there weren't compelling new features, which it turned out was entirely incorrect.

    I want to make it clear that this wasn't a mistake on the part of the v3 API team. They implemented what the technical leadership of Nova at the time asked for, and were very surprised when we discovered our mistake. We've now spent over a release cycle trying to recover from that mistake as gracefully as possible, but the upside is that the API we will be delivering is significantly more future proof than what we have in the current v2 API.

    At the Atlanta Juno summit, it was agreed that the v3 API would never ship in its current form, and that what we would instead do is provide a v2.1 API. This API would be 99% compatible with the current v2 API, with the incompatible things being stuff like if you pass a malformed parameter to the API we will now tell you instead of silently ignoring it, which we call 'input validation'. The other thing we are going to add in the v2.1 API is a system of 'micro-versions', which allow a client to specify what version of the API it understands, and for the server to gracefully degrade to older versions if required.

    This micro-version system is important, because the next step is to then start adding the v3 cleanups and fixes into the v2.1 API, but as a series of micro-versions. That way we can drag the majority of our users with us into a better future, without abandoning users of older API versions. I should note at this point that the mechanics for deciding what the minimum micro-version a version of Nova will support are largely undefined at the moment. My instinct is that we will tie to stable release versions in some way; if your client dates back to a release of Nova that we no longer support, then we might expect you to upgrade. However, that hasn't been debated yet, so don't take my thoughts on that as rigid truth.

    Frustratingly, the intent of the v2.1 API has been agreed and unchanged since the Atlanta summit, yet we're late in the Juno release and most of the work isn't done yet. This is because we got bogged down in the mechanics of how micro-versions will work, and how the translation for older API versions will work inside the Nova code later on. We finally unblocked this at the mid-cycle meetup, which means this work can finally progress again.

    The main concern that we needed to resolve at the mid-cycle was the belief that if the v2.1 API was implemented as a series of translations on top of the v3 code, then the translation layer would be quite thick and complicated. This raises issues of maintainability, as well as the amount of code we need to understand. The API team has now agreed to produce an API implementation that is just the v2.1 functionality, and will then layer things on top of that. This is actually invisible to users of the API, but it leaves us with an implementation where changes after v2.1 are additive, which should be easier to maintain.

    One of the other changes in the original v3 code is that we stopped proxying functionality for Neutron, Cinder and Glance. With the decision to implement a v2.1 API instead, we will need to rebuild that proxying implementation. To unblock v2.1, and based on advice from the HP and Rackspace public cloud teams, we have decided to delay implementing these proxies. So, the first version of the v2.1 API we ship will not have proxies, but later versions will add them in. The current v2 API implementation will not be removed until all the proxies have been added to v2.1. This is prompted by the belief that many advanced API users don't use the Nova API proxies, and therefore could move to v2.1 without them being implemented.

    Finally, I want to thank the Nova API team, especially Chris Yeoh and Kenichi Oomichi for their patience with us while we have worked through these complicated issues. It's much appreciated, and I find them a consistent pleasure to work with.

    That brings us to the end of my summary of the Nova Juno mid-cycle meetup. I'll write up a quick summary post that ties all of the posts together, but apart from that this series is now finished. Thanks for following along.

    Tags for this post: openstack juno nova mid-cycle summary api v3 v2.1
    Related posts: Juno nova mid-cycle meetup summary: nova-network to Neutron migration; Juno nova mid-cycle meetup summary: scheduler; Juno nova mid-cycle meetup summary: ironic; Juno nova mid-cycle meetup summary: conclusion; Juno nova mid-cycle meetup summary: DB2 support; Juno nova mid-cycle meetup summary: social issues

posted at: 16:52 | path: /openstack/juno | permanent link to this entry